Posts found under: FAQs

What is dyspraxia?

What is dyspraxia?

These children are often clumsy and awkward in their movements. They have particular problems with new motor skills and activities. They display difficulties with the registration and integration of sensory input, but may also fall under defensiveness and modulation disorders.

Some behaviours that can be observed are:

  • Very poor fine motor skills such as handwriting, cutting, motor planning skills
  • Very poor gross motor skills such as kicking, catching, throwing ball, sports are difficult
  • Difficulty imitating movements such as “Simon Says”
  • Trouble with balance, sequences of movements and bilateral coordination
  • May appear oblivious to certain touch/tactile input such as not noticing food left around their mouth when eating, not noticing dirt/uncomfortable textures against their skin, seem to have a high threshold for pain or not feel cold as readily as other children
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What are fine motor skills?

What are fine motor skills?

Fine motor skills can be described as the development of small muscles, usually in the hands, in coordination with the eyes. Fine motor abilities develop over time starting with primitive reflexes, such as grabbing, and then turning into more precise activities that involve eye-hand coordination. All fine motor activities are built upon four important abilities: Grasping objects, reaching out to objects, releasing objects deliberately, and turning the wrist in various directions. The term “skills” indicates a movement which involves precision in the controlling of the small muscles in the hand, fingers, and thumb. The development of these skills allows a child to complete tasks such as writing, drawing, and buttoning.

Developing fine motor skills during a child’s foundation stage is of vital importance. The reason for this is that as they grow older they will become much more dependent on these skills in order to complete scholastic- and functional tasks successfully and independently.

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How old should a child be to benefit from play therapy?

How old should a child be to benefit from play therapy?

Children from the age of 3 years are able to benefit from play therapy. Once a child is past the age of playing comfortably (about 8 or 9 depending on the child) other methods of therapy are used including drawings, puppet work, art therapy, talking therapies and sand tray work.

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Too young for OT?

My baby is not reaching a milestone (sitting, walking, talking etc.) The nurse has advised me to go for therapy. Is this really necessary or can I wait and see if she improves on her own?

Development and learning in the first 3 years of life occurs at an exceptional rate that will never again be matched.Not only is this an important time to lay the foundations for all other development, but studies have also found “window” periods in this developmental stage where certain skills need to be acquired or are “lost”.  In other words, small problems, which are easy to address at this stage, can become big problems, which are difficult to fix in the later years. A proactive approach of early intervention can prevent or minimize physical, academic or social problems that could negatively affect your child well into adulthood.

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